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ProduitsPartitions pour guitareGuitare seuleThree Latin Pieces

Three Latin Pieces

Three Latin Pieces

Compositeur: HOUGHTON Mark

DZ 713

Intermédiaire

ISBN: 2-89500-599-0

Guitare seule

12 p.

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Description

«This set begins with Bossa Brasiliera written for Stanley Yates in 2002. Right from the start it fairly bounces off the page at you. The rhythms are sharp and often on the offbeat, so careful reading is essential. Arpeggiated quaver runs interweave with an idea based on syncopated chords to create a real feel of forward motion. A slight drop in the tempo leads to a contrasting section and for a short while the two tempi vie with one another before an adagio section in harmonics leads to a reprise of the opening ideas somewhat newly developed. A moderately short coda leads to surprisingly final fortissimo chords. A milonga, Sentimental, follows; an interestingly fingered «altered« A minor chord sets the piece off, leading to a high voiced melody that rides on top of it. The harmony work is sad and piquant and a nice contrast to the previous movement. The final Rock'n'Rumba has some fiendish rhythms and at the prescribed allegro pace is nothing less than fiery and exciting, There are plenty of runs and lots happening on what are normally the weak beats of the bar, and the entire piece becomes quite frenzied. The coda that follows consists of the opening chord rhythm climbing higher and higher up the fingerboard, until a set of octaves brings us crashing down onto fortissimo E's.
This is lots of fun, quite difficult to play but great fun to listen to and is ideal for any decent players wanting something new to win an audience with. It certainly deserves that! Nicely printed as always with this fine publishing house.«
Chris Dumigan (Classical Guitar Magazine)

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