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ProduitsPartitions pour guitareGuitare seuleTrois postludes

Trois postludes

Trois postludes

Compositeur: OURKOUZOUNOV Atanas

DO 651

Intermédiaire

ISBN: 978-2-89503-427-8

Guitare seule

20 p.
Les Éditions Doberman-Yppan

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Description

“These three newly-published pieces are presented as a homage to the Hungarian composer Gyorgy Sandor Ligeti who died in 2006. Ligeti’s early musical style followed in the wake of Bartok but after leaving Hungary for Cologne he began a brief experimentation with electronic music which later influenced his atonal instrumental music. His later works utilised varied and highly complex rhythmic patterns and it seems that it is with this aspect in mind that these three Postludes have been composed. All these three rely heavily upon strongly defined rhythmic passages with the accented groupings of the notes being paramount. The Vivace third piece for example really is dependent on the player emphasising the initial 8th-note groupings (in 7/8 time) of 2+2+3, 3+2+2, 2+3+2. Starting with an Allegretto, then an Allegro and finally a Vivace things are pretty much on the go for the entire length of the threesome until, that is, the finishing 19 bars which unexpectedly, almost shockingly, drop down to an abrupt Lento, which drags the work to a drawn-out conclusion. For lovers of contemporary guitar music this set certainly merits investigation - as long as you have a very high grade technique.” Steve Marsh (Classical Guitar Magazine)

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